Team Kittenface
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My name is Lucy.
She/her.
This is primarily cats, feminism, assorted silliness, and feelings dumps. Ms. Frizzle is my idol. Avatar: The Last Airbender is very important to me

bumbleshark:

less unhealthy tragic lesbian movies, more lesbian romantic comedies

(via equalityformermaids)

nostandingonly-dancing:

Melbourne in the 1970s (source: my dad)

(via malheureuse-enfant)

Parent of a female teen whose school banned leggings

#yesallwomen have a right to an education without fashion policing by sexist administrators

(via thenocturnals)

(Source: meetingsinthedesert, via zucker-und-zimt)

egberts:

*goes to a party and awkwardly follows freind around the entire time*

(via zucker-und-zimt)

Anonymous said: white people doing yoga hurts no one. so quit spewing your bullshit to others to make south asians feel "empowered" about stopping white people doing a practice from your motherland. as you stated, you've never actually seen or practiced yoga in south asia and as a result your uninformed opinions are hurting everyone in the process. you don't personally get a wound everytime someone who isn't south asian does yoga.

newwavefeminism:

akashimikashi:

I never said that I get a wound when non-desis do yoga. There are other forms of cultural appropriation and colonization that can be far more harmful. The harm that I speak of has to do with representation of my culture. My family, friends, and I have been mocked and discriminated against because of our culture and religion - our symbols, clothing, diet, rituals, and language. But then I turn around and see white people doing the same things and being rewarded for it. So while I don’t get physical wounds, I resent the fact that everything my people do has to be filtered and diluted through white people before it becomes acceptable. I’m sorry if you don’t think that’s harmful.

I understand that the history of yoga in South Asia is complicated. There are several layers of colonialism & religious and caste discrimination that intersect with the history of yoga. Who does yoga even belong to? Brahmins, Hindus, all South Asians? What about South Asian Muslims? Well in the US, it seems to belong to skinny, upper/middle class, white women. While I am not able to speak extensively on yoga in South Asia, I understand that yoga in the US, similar to South Asia, has a complicated relationship with class/race/religion/etc.

I know that bhakti yoga is going to continue thrive as a billion dollar industry in the US, and there’s not much turning back (until Americans find a new fad). I know that my white neighbor doing her asanas isn’t threatening my physical safety. However, I know that yoga can’t be separated from a history of colonialism, and the inability for Americans to realize that is harmful.

yoga can’t be separated from a history of colonialism, and the inability for Americans to realize that is harmful.

(Source: cindymayweather, via liamdryden)

Anonymous said: Hey! So, a hypothetical question. Not a troll, just genuinely wondering what you think. If, hypothetically, history were switched and black people were in Europe and were essentially lucky like white people actually were in earlier times, would they have done the same thing to white people? (Slavery, colonialism, genocide and all the other terrible things) Do you think when people obtain power, they will do terrible things regardless?

lagos2bahia:

snarkulousworld:

lagos2bahia:

I don’t know what you mean by “lucky like white people”. I think firstly you need to realise that white Europeans where not “lucky”. They were brutal, violent and just plain sick. They made a choice to have no respect for humanity, and had absolutely no morals at all. The reason they were successful in colonising the world and enslaving black people was because they enacted a level of brutality and savagery that honestly I will never be able to fully understand. It is also important to understand that these ideas of superiority did not suddenly spring out of thin air. I mean if you study European history and look events like the crusades you can see that these ideas were always present in their culture.

Black people were in already in their lands living great lives before colonialism. My ancestors (well my maternal ancestors) were living happily in Yorubaland. We had technology, education and innovation and we didn’t feel the need to go around slaughtering people, destroying their homelands and cultures and enslaving them. Do you really think Africa was one large barren and poverty stricken wasteland prior to colonialism? There was vast amounts of power pre-colonial times, for example, the Kongo Kingdom, it used to be huge and vast empire, it was also big centre for trade with the Portuguese. All of this was ruined of course when King Leopold of Belgium decided to completely destroy the country and kill and mutilate large amounts of the population. Before imperialism and slavery, did we go around killing and raping your ancestors? Stealing your land and ignore the rights of your people’s? Did we rape your ancestors, deny them their humanity, and enslave them? Did we go around cutting off the arms and legs of men, women and children in your nations? When African people’s used to travel to Europe they didn’t go to conquer and capture, they went and contributed to society, shared ideas and spread technology.

There is a big difference between people doing terrible things for power (which of course is wrong) and people being just plain sick, which is what the white Europeans were. It is only a total lack of any single shred of morality which allowed them to do what they did. The savagery and brutality that was enacted is not some reflection of some great human flaw, it’s a consequence of deliberate actions and choices that were made and taken by the white people.

I think you’re missing the point of the question, which is “If the situation were reversed, would blacks have colonized whites/would Africa have colonized Europe/Asia/the Americas?”

There is literally no way of knowing the answer to this. But I don’t have a ton of faith in human nature.

I didn’t miss the point of the question, you simply cannot read. I wrote out a long answer showing that pre colonial times there were many time periods where African people’s were far ahead of Europe in terms of innovation and development, did they ever colonise the European people’s? No. African people’s had a large presence in Europe for centuries. Did they enslave European people’s? No. Please read properly.

gordman2:

Humorous Movie Marquee Mash-Ups

(via feministfangirl)

Remy Kouakou Kouame & Jessica Lennartsson, Pro Showcase, International Lindy Hop Championship 2013

Pure entertainment

bewbin:

Pacific Rim 2

bewbin:

Pacific Rim 2

(Source: catgifsoup, via zucker-und-zimt)

thesweetpianowritingdownmylife:

simplypotterheads:

My favourite part in Order of the Phoenix is when Harry and Sirius are playing hide and seek in the Ministry and Sirius is being silly behind the veil then he jumps out at Harry like “Haha found you!” and then they laugh and high five and go out for ice cream at Fortescue’s.

image

(via ithoughteventheboneswoulddo)

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

(via feministfangirl)

sourcedumal:

jaclynxhyde:

makeupandchucks:

This is great.

this needs to be criminalized everywhere. and upskirting/creeper shots. 

GOOD!

sourcedumal:

jaclynxhyde:

makeupandchucks:

This is great.

this needs to be criminalized everywhere. and upskirting/creeper shots. 

GOOD!

(via auntytimblr)

carpeumbra:

kittengrin:

kittengrin:

carpeumbra:

kittengrin:

carpeumbra:

Fifty Shades of Domestic Abuse

50 Shades of Damaging Stereotypes 

Fifty Shades of Wanna Guess How Many People Will Be Hospitalized Due To Flesh Wounds From Improper Knots After The Movie?

50 Shades of Glorified Abuse

50 Shades of Kidney Damage from Incompetent Crop Use

Fifty Shades of Pathological Violence Due To Past Trauma Isn’t Kink

(via ohitsjustkim)

badger-shenanigans:

purple-rose-emporium:

I’m in love!! I think I’ve just found my new favourite shawl pattern. It can be purchased from Ravelry here:

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/hypernova—-shawl-and-shawlette

i love that black and white one. 

(via rainbowbarnacle)