Team Kittenface
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Hello!
My name is Lucy.
Grey-bisexual
She/her/hers.
This is primarily cats, feminism, assorted silliness, and feelings dumps.
Ms. Frizzle is my idol.
Avatar: The Last Airbender is very important to me
Dejan Stojanovic (via wordsnquotes)

(via ithoughteventheboneswoulddo)

hoodfuturism:

this look tho

(Source: allnicki, via wattleandgum)

carry-on-wayward-fallen-angel:

finepieceofcas:

a genderqueer superhero who wears a binder and hides their face so everyone assumes they’re male but then they have c cups and never bind as a civilian so their secret identity is safe

Actually theres an Argentinian comic/tv show called Cybersix thats pretty much exactly this, except the other way around:

"Cybersix" (superhero persona)

image

image

"Adrien Seidelman" (civilian persona)

image

image

i believe all the episodes are on youtube if you want to watch it…

(via wattleandgum)

Elyse Mofo, “Don’t Tell Me to Love My Body” (via nightrevelations)

(via wattleandgum)

knitmeapony:

I love my skin!

Oh my god SO IMPORTANT SO SO SO IMPORTANT

(Source: arthaemisia, via auntytimblr)

booksoverbae:

georgiaokweeffe:

Be wary of those who apologize for how you feel instead of apologizing for what they did to you

T H I S !

(via auntytimblr)

vegkid:

This made me forget all of my problems for like 12 seconds.

(Source: lovetherunning, via ithoughteventheboneswoulddo)

(Source: gudrunwg, via apostcardorapurpose)

(Source: hatsandanimals, via rainbowbarnacle)

nprfreshair:

In 1951, an African-American woman named Henrietta Lacks was diagnosed with terminal cervical cancer. She was treated at Johns Hopkins University, where a doctor named George Gey snipped cells from her cervix without telling her. Gey discovered that Lacks’ cells could not only be kept alive, but would also grow indefinitely.
For the past 60 years Lacks’ cells have been cultured and used in experiments ranging from determining the long-term effects of radiation to testing the live polio vaccine. Her cells were commercialized and have generated millions of dollars in profit for the medical researchers who patented her tissue.
Lacks’ family, however, didn’t know the cell cultures existed until more than 20 years after her death.
In 2010 we spoke to Medical writer Rebecca Skloot who examines the legacy of Lacks’ contribution to science — and effect that has had on her family — in her bestselling book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,
Now, 62 years later the Lacks family has given consent to this controversial medical contribution. Researchers who wish to use “HeLa” cells now have to submit a request and proposal that will be reviewed by the Lacks family. This new agreement is in the interest of respecting the family’s privacy, though, they still will not profit financially from any medical study. 
This is a remarkable story, both medically and ethically, about the rights we have to our bodies, even beyond the grave. 
image via NPR

nprfreshair:

In 1951, an African-American woman named Henrietta Lacks was diagnosed with terminal cervical cancer. She was treated at Johns Hopkins University, where a doctor named George Gey snipped cells from her cervix without telling her. Gey discovered that Lacks’ cells could not only be kept alive, but would also grow indefinitely.

For the past 60 years Lacks’ cells have been cultured and used in experiments ranging from determining the long-term effects of radiation to testing the live polio vaccine. Her cells were commercialized and have generated millions of dollars in profit for the medical researchers who patented her tissue.

Lacks’ family, however, didn’t know the cell cultures existed until more than 20 years after her death.

In 2010 we spoke to Medical writer Rebecca Skloot who examines the legacy of Lacks’ contribution to science — and effect that has had on her family — in her bestselling book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,


Now, 62 years later the Lacks family has given consent to this controversial medical contribution. Researchers who wish to use “HeLa” cells now have to submit a request and proposal that will be reviewed by the Lacks family. This new agreement is in the interest of respecting the family’s privacy, though, they still will not profit financially from any medical study.

This is a remarkable story, both medically and ethically, about the rights we have to our bodies, even beyond the grave.

image via NPR

(via jaredculture)

I have a massive urge to watch probably-terrible chick flicks with fun people and waste lots of time. That would be a nice thing

femmepireradical:

okcupidescapades:

sorry this is so belaboured, but i wanted to make this guy admit he was worried about getting thrown in jail after having sex with me

men who eagerly wait for young girls to turn 18 so they can legally have sex with them are in the running for creepiest people on the planet

GET. IT. GIRL.

I love seeing young girls standing up for themselves in ways I never knew I could until I was almost THIRTY.

I seirously just…wow. I’m in awe of young women today.

(via feministfangirl)

gaydicks420:

the sims 4 announcements are so bleak and depressing out of context 

(via auntytimblr)

thenimbus:

heather-m00ch:

Shrek Barbie is my fashion icon

How in gods name is this a real thing

thenimbus:

heather-m00ch:

Shrek Barbie is my fashion icon

How in gods name is this a real thing

(Source: artschoolradio, via liamdryden)

iwannaseeitall:

s1uts:

imdemetrialynn:

britches-and-hose:

imdemetrialynn:

I think we all feeling his expression to this shit right now. lmao 

I said I feel like him before I even scrolled down to see the rest of the post. We’ve been saying she’s mocking us but so many of you still don’t get it.

shit is clear as day in their face though. I’ll never understand why some choose to be blinded. 

Somebody kick her ass please

I can’t…

(via feministfangirl)